The Twenty-Something Tumble: 10 Tips For Dealing With the Issues of Early Adulthood

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Sometimes, being an adult is terrible.

Gone are the days of playing outside with your friends all day without a care in the world, coming home to food and a bed, going to school to learn all day and being able to spend every dollar you have in the world on candy. As adults, we now need to think about things like remembering to pick up milk from the store, finding more work to save more money, hiring Whizz bond cleaners to clean our old house up for us, moving into our new house over a busy weekend, etc.

The to-do list never ends, but it doesn’t have to be this way forever.

We’ve put together a list of 10 tips for dealing with the issues of early adulthood in order to aid you in this awkward, frustrating, wonderful and amazing journey through young adulthood.

Money

Money is most likely going to be an issue in your early adulthood, namely how much you have and how to get more. Depending on where you live, jobs might be scarce, so don’t be afraid of branching out into other areas, such as online work to earn some extra money.

Time

Your time will seemingly disappear at the drop of a hat. You have one thing to do on the weekend, like cleaning the house, and you blink and it’s monday again. Try writing down the events of the day in a journal, this will help you process the passage of time a bit better and will show you just how much time you really have.

Friends

Your friend group will change dramatically from your high-school group, and this is ok. Try to keep contact with those you really care about, and come to terms with the idea that people come and go in life, and some of your friends will leave your life in this time. Think of it as an opportunity to meet more people instead of a loss.

Family

Your family will start treating you like an adult, which means you need to start behaving more like one. Clean up after yourself more if you live at home, take your parents out to dinner sometimes, or even just cook for them once in awhile, and spend more time with your grandparents, you’ll be glad you did later on.

Travel

Travel will infect you fairly soon, and once you’ve got the travel bug nothing else is anywhere near as interesting. Try to pick tourist-friendly locations for your first few forays out of your country and into the world, the more experienced you are at navigating foreign landscapes, the further off the beaten track you can travel.

Transport

You will want to get your own vehicle at some point in this ever-changing decade. A car will drain a huge amount of your money, more than you could ever know, and a motorbike is more dangerous than you’d think. It’s a toss up between these two, as motorbikes can often cost ten percent of what a car would, but cars are often more useful.

Study

Find something you absolutely love and study that as your career. Don’t give into the pressures of family or friends to enter a career path you aren’t interested in, or it will just make things harder and less fun down the track. If you’d do it for free as a hobby and there’s money it, it’s the right career for you.

Housing

You will move out, and most likely you will have to move back in. This isn’t the end of the world, but it is a difficult time. Be ready to have the best and worst times of your life out of home, you’ll probably need to hire a cleaning service to get your bond back, and if/when you return, be grateful that you have a place to go to recuperate financially and emotionally.

Relationships

Relationships as an adult are better and stranger than those in your teens. You will meet a person that you adore and seeing them will be a joyful effort in itself, as you no longer have a mutual school to see each other at. Relish in this experience, and treat your partners well.

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The way the world looks at you as a new adult can sometimes be intimidating, don’t let this crush your spirit. You are your own person, and you don’t owe the collective older adults anything. Pave your own way in life and be as happy as you can be.

The journey through early adulthood is rife with potholes, but as long as you know where to look you’ll never stumble.

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