Buying Guide for LED Downlights

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LED lights may have taken some time to become popular, but there is no doubt that today LED lights are the solution to lighting a home. LED light bulbs have many advantages over halogen lamps, and are increasingly retrofitted into homes and businesses where halogen was previously used. If you are considering buying LED light bulbs, take a look at this quick guide for the answers to common questions.

What is an LED GU10?

You may have seen the term gu10 led when looking at LED bulbs. GU10 refers to the base of the lamp, or the cap, and it signifies that there are two pins at the end which look a little like feet. The LED G10 is an energy-saving alternative when you want to convert to led lights from halogen bulbs.

Do All LED Bulbs Have a Cold Light?

Many people assume that all led bulbs have a cold white colour, i.e., the light coming from the bulb is bright and does not seem very warm. But LED bulbs do come in a variety of different colour temperatures. A colour temperature is used to classify how cold or warm the light is. A very cold white colour would be classified high up on the colour temperature scale, while a warm white light would be low down on the temperature scale. If you want to set a cosy or warm mood in a room then you should choose the warm shades of light. In a bathroom or a modern kitchen where you want things to sparkle it is helpful to choose the coolest white colour.

How Do I Know What Wattage to Choose?

In the past there was only one real way to measure the light output of a bulb and that was the wattage. But nowadays there are a variety of factors that come into play which affect how much light reaches a surface. These include reflectors, optics, and the technology of spotlights. It is more helpful to look at the output in terms of lumens, which is another way to measure light brightness.

When to Use Dimmer Switches with LED Lights

It is best to check with the manufacturer whether the LED bulb you are choosing is suitable for a dimmer switch or not. However, it is worth bearing in mind that even if a bulb is dimmable it may not completely work with your existing dimmer switch as these are designed for different circuit loads.